Authenticity – What Consumers Really Want (But Can’t Afford)

I recently finished reading Authenticity – What Consumers Really Want, by James H. Gilmore and B. Joseph Pine.

The process of reading the book got me thinking about what authenticity really means and how we search for it in different ways.  If the key to happiness is living a life that is personally meaningful and true to what we really want – an authentic life – it makes perfect sense that we would so strongly seek out authenticity in every possible area of our lives.  …

A Real UAW

This summer (remember summer?  When it was warm?) I finally got around to reading The Millionaire Next Door, one of the quintessential personal finance books.  Besides shining light on the habits that make and keep people wealthy, MND also gave rise to an intriguing measure of wealth accumulation.

In short, MND highlights the fact that most actual millionaires practice Stealth Wealth by driving non luxury cars, living in modest houses, and generally appearing “middle class” while secretly dedicating their time and energy towards starting businesses, managing their finances, and living below their means.…

Serving Consumers

Every job produces something.  The quality, necessity, and application of what exactly is produced is debatable, but at the core of each job is the act of production.

Some jobs produce ideas, data, analysis, feedback, and instructions.  Others produce physical products, like iPhones, cars, and furniture.  More produce services like government or yard care.  And most produce all three in one way or another.…

Making vs. Earning

Photographers will tell you that they make pictures rather than take them (thanks to Ansel Adams).  Saying you “make” a photograph implies intent, purpose, reasoning, and planning – in effect to validate photography as a “real” pursuit that requires practice and work.

Photography is often viewed as the death of painting, a medium that took real skill and years to master.  …

Experts on Value

Most people know what they like.  By the time people acquire enough earning power to enable them to get what they want, they’ve already spent years developing likes and defining who they are.  Once the basics are satisfied they can start thinking about what they would like more – a better car, a house, a new wardrobe.  …